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Neoproterozoic

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The Neoproterozoic Era is the unit of geologic time from 1,000 to 542.0 ± 1.0 million years ago.[1] The terminal Era of the formal Proterozoic Eon (or the informal "Precambrian"), it is further subdivided into the Tonian, Cryogenian, and Ediacaran Periods. The most severe glaciation known in the geologic record occurred during the Cryogenian, when ice sheets reached the equator and formed a possible "Snowball Earth". The earliest fossils of multicellular life are found in the Ediacaran, including the earliest animals.

GeologyEdit

At the onset of the Neoproterozoic the supercontinent Rodinia, which had assembled during the late Mesoproterozoic, straddled the equator. During the Tonian, rifting commenced which broke Rodinia into a number of individual land masses. Possibly as a consequence of the low-latitude position of most continents, several large-scale glacial events occurred during the Era including the Sturtian and Marinoan glaciations. These glaciations are believed to have been so severe that there were ice sheets at the equator--a state known as the "Snowball Earth".

SubdivisionsEdit

The Russians divide the Siberian Neoproterozoic into the Baikalian from 850 to 650 Ma (loosely equivalent to the Cryogenian), which overlies the Mayanian, from 1100 to 850 Ma, then the Aimchanian.[2]

PaleobiologyEdit

Main article: Ediacaran biota

The idea of the Neoproterozoic Era came on the scene relatively recently — after about 1960. Nineteenth century paleontologists set the start of multicelled life at the first appearance of hard-shelled animals called trilobites and archeocyathids. This set the beginning of the Cambrian period. In the early 20th century, paleontologists started finding fossils of multicellular animals that predated the Cambrian boundary. A complex fauna was found in South West Africa in the 1920s but was misdated. Another was found in South Australia in the 1940s but was not thoroughly examined until the late 1950s. Other possible early fossils were found in Russia, England, Canada, and elsewhere (see Ediacaran biota). Some were determined to be pseudofossils, but others were revealed to be members of rather complex biotas that are still poorly understood. At least 25 regions worldwide yielded metazoan fossils prior to the classical Cambrian boundary.[3]

A few of the early animals appear possibly to be ancestors of modern animals. Most fall into ambiguous groups of frond-like animals(?); discoids that might be holdfasts for stalked animals(?) ("medusoids"); mattress-like forms; small calcaerous tubes; and armored animals of unknown provenance. These were most commonly known as Vendian biota until the formal naming of the Period, and are currently known as Ediacaran biota. Most were soft bodied. The relationships, if any, to modern forms are obscure. Some paleontologists relate many or most of these forms to modern animals. Others acknowledge a few possible or even likely relationships but feel that most of the Ediacaran forms are representatives of (an) unknown animal type(s).

In addition to Ediacaran biota, later two other types of biota were discovered in China (the so-called Doushantuo formation and Hainan formation).

Terminal periodEdit

Main article: Ediacaran

The nomenclature for the terminal period of the Neoproterozoic has been unstable. Russian geologists referred to the last period of the Neoproterozoic as the Vendian, and the Chinese called it the Sinian, and most Australians and North Americans used the name Ediacaran. However, in 2004, the International Union of Geological Sciences ratified the Ediacaran age to be a geological age of the Neoproterozoic, ranging from 635 to 542.0 ± 1.0 million years ago.[1] The Ediacaran boundaries are the only Precambrian boundaries defined by biologic Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Points, rather than the absolute Global Standard Stratigraphic Ages.

Notes Edit

  1. ^ a b Ogg 2008.
  2. ^ Khomentovsky, V (2008). "Mayanian (1100–850 Ma) – Prebaikalian Upper Riphean of Siberia". Russian Geology and Geophysics 49: 1. doi:10.1016/j.rgg.2007.12.001. 
  3. ^ Knoll 2006.


References Edit

Preceded by Archean eon 2.5 Ga - Proterozoic eon - 542 Ma Followed by Phanerozoic eon
2.6 Ga - Paleoproterozoic era - 1.6 Ga 1.6 Ga - Mesoproterozoic era - 1.0 Ga 1.0 Ga - Neoproterozoic era - 542 Ma
Siderian Rhyacian Orosirian Statherian Calymmian Ectasian Stenian Tonian Cryogenian Ediacaran

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