Wikia

Fossil Wiki

Home

Talk4
6,561pages on
this wiki
Official policies
Helping out
Protoavisbody

Protoavis (meaning "first bird") is a problematic taxon of archosaurian whose fossils have been recovered from Late Triassic Norian stage deposits near Post, Texas. Much controversy remains over the animal, with many different interpretations of what Protoavis actually is existing. When it was first described, the fossils were ascribed to a primitive bird which, if the identification is valid, would push back avian origins some 60-75 million years. The original describer of Protoavis texensis, Sankar Chatterjee of Texas Tech University, interpreted the type specimen to have come from a single animal, specifically a 35 cm tall bird that lived in what is now Texas, USA, between 225 and 210 million years ago. Though it existed far earlier than Archaeopteryx, its skeletal structure is allegedly more bird-like. However, this description of Protoavis assumes that Protoavis has been correctly interpreted as a bird. Almost all paleontologists doubt that Protoavis is a bird, or that all remains assigned to it even come from a single species, because of the circumstances of its discovery and unconvincing avian synapomorphies in its fragmentary material. (Read more...)


Recently promoted: Protoavis  • Cloudinidae  • Small shelly fauna

Did you know Did you know...                                                      Suggest an article

From The Fossil Wiki's newest articles:

Acrocanthosaurus head BW

Geological hammer Paleontologist of the Month

Paul Sereno2

Paul Sereno is an American paleontologist who is the discoverer of several new dinosaur species on several continents. He has conducted excavations at sites as varied as Inner Mongolia, Argentina, Morocco and Niger. He is a professor at the University of Chicago and a National Geographic "explorer-in-residence." Sereno's most widely publicized discovery is that of a nearly complete specimen of Sarcosuchus imperator (popularly known as SuperCroc) at Gadoufaoua in the Tenere desert of Niger. Other major discoveries include Eoraptor - the oldest known dinosaur fossil, Jobaria, the first good skull of Carcharodontosaurus iguidensis, Afrovenator, Suchomimus and the African pterosaur. (Read more...)

In the news2009 In the News                                Suggest a news item

Tianyuraptor NT

Random Featured Quote (Refresh)


"Fossilized brains are unusual, and this is by far the oldest known example."
John Maisey, Curator in the Division of Paleontology at the AMNH describing the discovery of the oldest known fossil brain.


Community                                           AboutFAQThe Field Site


==Explore the prehistoric world==
4567.17 Ma - Precambrian era - 542 Ma
3800 Ma - Archean eon - 2500 Ma 2500 Ma - Proterozoic eon - 542 Ma
3800 Ma - Archean eon - 2500 Ma 2600 Ma - Paleoproterozoic era - 1600 Ma 1600 Ma - Mesoproterozoic era - 1000 Ma 1000 Ma - Neoproterozoic era - 542 Ma
Eoarchean Paleoarchean Mesoarchean Neoarchean Siderian Rhyacian Orosirian Statherian Calymmian Ectasian Stenian Tonian Cryogenian Ediacaran


542 Ma - Phanerozoic eon - Present
542 Ma - Paleozoic era - 251 Ma 251 Ma - Mesozoic era - 65 Ma 65 Ma - Cenozoic era - Present
Cambrian Ordovician Silurian Devonian Carboniferous Permian
Triassic
Jurassic
Cretaceous
Paleogene Neogene Quaternary

Featured pictures Random Featured Image (Refresh)

Sauropod 2009 neck study

Range of possible habitual head angles in the basal sauropodomorph A. Massospondylus, and the sauropods B. Camarasaurus, C. Diplodocus and D. Nigersaurus.

The sauropods, comprise an infraorder or clade of saurischian ("lizard-hipped") dinosaurs. They are notable for the enormous sizes attained by some species, and the group includes many of the largest animals to have ever lived on land. Well-known genera include Apatosaurus (formerly known as Brontosaurus), Brachiosaurus and Diplodocus. Sauropods first appeared in the Late Triassic Period, where they somewhat resembled the closely related (and possibly ancestral) group Prosauropoda. By the Late Jurassic (150 million years ago), sauropods were widespread (especially the diplodocids and brachiosaurids). By the Late Cretaceous, those groups had mainly been replaced by the titanosaurs, which had a near-global distribution. However, as with all other non-avian dinosaurs, the titanosaurs died out in the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event. Fossilised remains of sauropods have been found on every continent except Antarctica.

Earth-ScanPaleontology links

Join us in exploring the prehistoric world

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki