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The Kyzyl Kum also called Qyzylqum, is the 11th largest desert in the world. Its name means red sand in both Uzbek and Kazakh. It is located in Central Asia in the doab between the rivers Amu Darya and Syr Darya, and is divided between Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and (partly) Turkmenistan. It covers about 298,000 km² (approximately 115,000 sq mi).

PaleontologyEdit

The Kyzul Kum has exposed rock formations that have yielded a number of fossils. Of particular interest is the Bissekty Formation of Uzbekistan, from the early Late Cretaceous, which has produced several species of early birds: Enantiornis martini and E. walkeri, Kizylkumavis cretacea, Kuszholia mengi, Lenesornis kaskarovi, Sazavis prisca, Zhyraornis kaskarovi, and Z. logunovi are recognized as valid species. Tyrannosaurid, therizinosaurid, ostrich-mimic, oviraptorosaurian, troodontid, armored, duckbilled, and horned dinosaurs are also known from this rock unit.[1] Other fossils from the Cretaceous rocks of the Kyzyl Kum include tree trunks, pelecypods, beetles, sharks, rays, bony fish,[2]frogs, salamanders,[3]turtles,[4]crocodylomorphs,[2]pterosaurs,[5] and a varied fauna of small early mammals.[6] Paleontologists that have worked in this area include J. David Archibald, Alexander Averianov, Sergei Kurzanov, Lev Nesov, Anatoly Riabinin, Anatoly Rozhdestvensky, and Hans-Dieter Sues.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Weishampel, David B.; Paul M. Barrett, Rodolfo Coria, A., Jean Le Loeuff, Zhao Xijin Xu Xing, Ashok Sahni, Elizabeth M.P. Gomani and Christopher R. Noto (2004). "Dinosaur Distribution". in David B. Weishampel, Peter Dodson and Halszka Osmólska (eds.). The Dinosauria (2nd ed. ed.). Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 517–606. ISBN 0-520-24209-2.
  2. ^ a b Nesov, Lev A.. "Mesozoic and Paleogene birds of the USSR and their paleoenvironments". in Campbell, Kenneth E. Jr. (ed.). Papers in Avian Paleontology Honoring Pierce Brodkorb. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Science Series 36. Los Angeles, CA: Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. pp. 465-478.
  3. ^ Shishkin, Mikhail A. (2000). "Mesozoic amphibians from Mongolia and the Central Asiatic republics". in Benton, Michael J.; Shishkin, Mikhail A.; Unwin, David M.; and Kurochkin, Evgenii N. (eds.). The Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 297-308. ISBN 0-521-55476-X.
  4. ^ Sukhanov, Vladimir B. (2000). "Mesozoic turtles of Middle and Central Asia". in Benton, Michael J.; Shishkin, Mikhail A.; Unwin, David M.; and Kurochkin, Evgenii N. (eds.). The Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 309-367. ISBN 0-521-55476-X.
  5. ^ Unwin, David M.; and Bakhurina, Natasha N. (2000). "Pterosaurs from Russia, Middle Asia and Mongolia". in Benton, Michael J.; Shishkin, Mikhail A.; Unwin, David M.; and Kurochkin, Evgenii N. (eds.). The Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 420-433. ISBN 0-521-55476-X.
  6. ^ Averianov, Alexander O. (2000). "Mammals from the Mesozoic of Kirgizstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan and Tadzhikistan". in Benton, Michael J.; Shishkin, Mikhail A.; Unwin, David M.; and Kurochkin, Evgenii N. (eds.). The Age of Dinosaurs in Russia and Mongolia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 627-652. ISBN 0-521-55476-X.

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