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Ebrachosaurus
Fossil range: Late Triassic
Scientific classification

Class:

Sauropsida

Order:

Aetosauria

Family:

Stagonolepididae

Genus:

Ebrachosaurus Kuhn, 1936

Species:

  • E. singularis Kuhn, 1936 (type)

Ebrachosaurus is an extinct genus of aetosaur[1]. It was named after the town of Ebrach, Germany, near an outcrop of the Blasensandstein Formation where the original fossils have been found[2]. Other Blasensandstein fauna include the temnospondyl Metoposaurus and the phytosaur Francosuchus[3]. The genus has often been considered synonymous with the closely related Stagonolepis[4][5][6]. Unfortunately, the holotype specimen was lost during World War II[7], so its relationships within Stagonolepididae remain indeterminant[8].

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Carroll, R.L. (1988). Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution. WH Freeman and Company, New York ISBN 0-7167-1822-7
  2. ^ Kuhn, O. (1936). Weitere Parasuchier und Labyrinthodonten aus dem Blasensandstein des mittleren Keuper von Ebrach. Palaeontographica 83:61–98.
  3. ^ Langer, M. C. (2005). Studies on continental Late Triassic tetrapod biochronology. II. The Ischigualastian and a Carnian global correlation. Journal of South American Earth Sciences 19:219–239
  4. ^ Benton, M.J., Walker, A.D. (1985). Palaeoecology, taphonomy, and dating of Permo-Triassic reptiles from Elgin, north-east Scotland. Palaeontology 28 207–234.
  5. ^ Heckert, A. B., and Lucas, S. G. (1999) A new aetosaur (Reptilia: Archosauria) from the Upper Triassic of Texas and the phylogeny of aetosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 19(1):50-68.
  6. ^ Heckert, A. B., and Lucas, S. G. (2000). Taxonomy, phylogeny, biostratigraphy, biochronology, paleobiogeography, and evolution of the Late Triassic Aetosauria (Archosauria:Crurotarsi). Zentralblatt für Geologie und Paläontologie Teil I 1998 Heft 11-12, p. 1539-1587.
  7. ^ Lucas, S. G. (2007). Global Triassic tetrapod biostratigraphy and biochronology: 2007 status. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 41:229–240
  8. ^ Parker, W. G. (2003). Description of a new specimen of Desmatosuchus haplocerus from the Late Triassic of Northern Arizona. Unpublished MS thesis. Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff. 315 pp. [1]


External linksEdit


Postosuchus BW

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